How Indigenous burning shaped the Klamath’s forests for a millennia

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Dense stands of Douglas fir trees surround South Twin Lake in California. (Photo by Clarke Knight, summer 2018)

Combining scientific data with Indigenous oral histories and ecological knowledge, research by Blum Center Associate Director for Sustainable Development Matthew Potts shows how cultural burning practices of Native people of the Klamath Mountains helped shape the region’s forests for at least a millennia prior to European colonization.

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